For Diabetes Patients, a Care Coach Is Just a Click Away

Bottom of the article
Close-up photo of a person holding a phone and a pill bottle.

CVS Health pharmacist Matthew Scarnecchia could see the concern on the face of his patient. Richard, a 59-year-old man who suffered not only from Type 2 diabetes but also high blood pressure and high cholesterol, was alarmed by the results of his latest blood-sugar test. His A1c was 7.5 percent — above his goal range of below 7 percent.

With a few questions, Scarnecchia learned that Richard was worried about also getting low blood sugar from his diabetes medication. It turned out that Richard was taking his diabetes medication in the morning, but not eating until he was at his workplace after a long commute. “I recommended that he take his Glipizide with his breakfast at work to see if that would help,” Scarnecchia says. It did. Just a few months later, Richard’s A1c had dropped to 6.3 percent and he was no longer having low blood sugar readings.

Nearly as satisfying, this one-on-one consult took place without either man leaving his desk, even though they were 2,000 miles apart – one in Arizona, one in Florida. Through his insurance provider, the patient had signed on to CVS Health’s Medication Therapy Management program and met with Scarnecchia face-to-face via an online app that can be accessed through any computer or mobile device.

Personal Consultations from Anywhere

Once enrolled in the program, patients can slot in a video consultation from anywhere. In addition to their regular doctor’s appointments, they can talk with a specialized pharmacist who can advise on medication compliance, interactions and side effects, and, most importantly, suggest some everyday adjustments, such as diet and exercise, that can make an immense difference in controlling diabetes.

CVS Health’s Medication Therapy Management program provides patients with one-on-one care with a specialized pharmacist who can help them better manage their chronic condition from the comfort of home.
Tweet this

A video meeting benefits patients and pharmacists alike. A patient can show his or her latest blood-sugar results or other medical reports without needing to mail them. If a patient is having issues injecting insulin, the pharmacist can point to possible alternative injection sites on a visual model. The one-on-one view also allows pharmacists to pick up on nonverbal cues. “I can see if a patient seems confused about their results and give explanations that might be helpful,” says Scarnecchia.

Patients can take advantage of this face-to-face coaching even before they might need medication. With diabetes tied to so many other health concerns — high blood pressure, nerve damage, heart disease — it’s especially vital to try to halt or slow down the condition’s progress.

Small Changes Can Make a Big Difference

When an A1c of 5.8 percent tipped him into the prediabetic range, 60-year-old Jeff welcomed the chance for video chats with pharmacist Brian O’Halloran, and has kept those appointments every three to four months. “During our visits, we’ve discussed healthy lifestyle changes,” says O’Halloran. “Jeff decided to stop drinking diet sodas, and reported, nine months later, that he’d stayed off them.” 

Small but attainable goals are easier to meet, explains O’Halloran.

“In March 2018, Jeff said he wanted to lose 5 pounds before his next time we talked. I told him ‘Don’t shop the aisles.’ That’s where grocery stores stock all the processed foods. Instead, I suggested he shop the perimeter — where he could pick up fresh vegetables and meats. When we spoke again in July, he’d lost 6 pounds.”

Both pharmacists find that patients look forward to the on-screen sessions, which often last for 30 minutes. Even a patient’s family member may stop by to wave hello, says Scarnecchia. Patients can also contact the pharmacist in between scheduled sessions. When a patient shares good news about improved bloodwork, O’Halloran warmly congratulates them on their success.

For diabetes patients, a video visit is part of the “big picture” of managing of their condition. Patients can ask questions that may not have occurred to them while in their doctor’s office. “It’s more like a conversation,” says O’Halloran, “and more comfortable for the patients.”

To learn more about our enterprise-wide approach to diabetes management and care, visit our Managing Diabetes with CVS Health page.

To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

Close-up photo of a person holding a phone and a pill bottle.
Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
1
Display Hero
Off

Helping Patients Better Manage Diabetes

Bottom of the article

As CVS Health’s Senior Director of Transformation Stella Wong explains, diabetes is a difficult condition to manage. There are a number of things patients need to do on a routine basis, such as checking blood glucose levels, eating right, exercising, or taking the right medications at the right time.

“The list is literally hundreds of items long,” Stella says.

CVS Health is in a unique position to help. From new, innovative programs to in-store screenings at MinuteClinics and HealthHUB locations, learn how we’re helping people with diabetes better manage their condition and lead healthier lives.

From new, innovative programs to in-store screenings at MinuteClinics and HealthHUB locations, watch this video to learn how CVS Health is helping people with diabetes better manage their condition and lead healthier lives.
Tweet this

“Our tremendous reach into people’s communities (and) our focus on new technologies will allow us to add an entire other layer of support and care for patients,” says Dr. Alan Lotvin, Chief Transformation Officer. “We have the opportunity and the ability to fundamentally reshape and augment the care delivery system in the United States.”

Watch the video above to learn more.

To learn more about our enterprise-wide approach to diabetes management and care, visit our Managing Diabetes with CVS Health page.

To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
14
Display Hero
Off

Why Building Trust is Key to Delivering Crucial Care to Pharmacy Patients

Bottom of the article
Close-up photograph of doctor holding patient’s hand.

CVS Health pharmacists are often called on to employ not only clinical services, but a fair amount of detective work as well. Patients often report that their diet, exercise, and medications are all in check, but if they’re not experiencing results to match, then it’s time to dig a little deeper.

Elderly or infirm patients can pose special challenges: They can be mistrustful of medical professionals, stuck in old habits, and might not even be physically able to visit their local CVS for prescription recommendations and tests. Often, all the pharmacist has to go on is phone consultations and lab results. And yet, often that’s enough to produce life-changing results.

Pharmacist Angela Stigliano realizes that building trust with patients is a necessary part of the job. She’s a clinical pharmacist for CVS Health’s Medication Therapy Management (MTM) service, and provides care to members over the phone or via video chat.

She shared a recent success story about a patient with diabetes that demonstrates why trust is so important. The percentage of Americans 65 and older with diabetes is high, at about 25.2 percent or 12.0 million seniors (diagnosed and undiagnosed).https://www.diabetes.org/resources/statistics/statistics-about-diabetes It is a disease that can be well-controlled with diet and lifestyle changes — but they’re not always easy to make and adhere to without a helping hand.

Asking the Right Questions to Get a Diabetes Patient Back on Track

In March 2018 Stigliano began working with Vicki, a woman in her sixties who reported having a stroke that had left her with mild physical impairments. Though she had a long history with diabetes and high cholesterol, her doctors were confident that she would make a full recovery.

In their initial phone call, Vicki insisted that she followed a strict diet and was very mobile, but given the precarious state of her health, that “didn’t make sense,” says Stigliano: She was gaining weight, her A1C was unstable, and she wasn’t taking her cholesterol medication as prescribed. These factors put her at risk not only for another stroke, but heart disease as well.

Through a series of thirty-minute phone calls every few months, Stigliano fostered a friendly relationship with Vicki.

“I would use phrasing like ‘Tell me about your diet these days,’ instead of saying, ‘Have you been dieting?’ This allowed her to tell me about her diet without the feeling I was searching for a ‘correct answer,’” she says. “It can be difficult to be forthcoming with a stranger about a sensitive topic like being overweight or unable to walk and care for yourself properly.”

These days, there’s a lot of confusion about what a “healthy diet” actually means. Vicki reported trying a keto diet, and skipping meals, both unwise choices for a diabetic.

“Purposely not eating enough can be just as unhealthy as eating fast food every day. Not having enough range in your diet can also become unhealthy as well,” says Stigliano. She recommends the easy-to-follow MyPlate tactic to patients like Vicki. “You’re not telling them what to eat and what not to eat, but to focus more on portion sizes; to look at their diet and their plate a little bit differently.”

A CVS Health clinical pharmacist shares a recent diabetes patient success story that demonstrates the importance of relationship-building in her work.
Tweet this

After several months, Stigliano was pleased to hear that Vicki had begun to be more honest with herself and her medical team. She compromised with her prescriber, and was put on a low-intensity statin three times a week. And, as Stigliano had gently suggested over the course of their interactions, she began a low-carb, high-protein diet, and increased her physical activity.

All of these changes started to pay off. Vicki’s A1C had been steadily improving due to her adjusting her insulin, but after taking the initiative to make lifestyle changes, she had lost approximately twenty-five pounds, reduced her A1C to consistent readings at or around 7 percent, and mentioned that her LDL cholesterol had come down by 100 points on her latest lab test. And she felt positive, healthy, and empowered.

“When we first started talking, Vicki was not in good spirits,” says Stigliano. “She was very upset about her stroke, and really down, very defeatist. But, after Vicki began to take control of her health, Stigliano says, “It sounded like I was speaking to a whole different person. She was excited to tell me about her lifestyle, the change in her as person. She ended our most recent phone call by saying, ‘I’ll talk to you soon. I need someone to stay on top of me!’”

To learn more about our enterprise-wide approach to diabetes management and care, visit our Managing Diabetes with CVS Health page.

To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
0
Display Hero
Off

Supporting the Fight Against HIV/AIDS

Bottom of the article

This World AIDS Day, CVS Health is recognizing the progress made in the fight against HIV/AIDS and is teaming up with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to help further reduce the spread of the HIV virus.

Reducing transmission of HIV

Currently, there are an estimated 1.1 million people in the U.S. living with HIV, and approximately 38,000 people diagnosed annually. Scientific advances over the past few decades have changed the paradigm for the prevention and treatment of the disease. For example, an HIV diagnosis is no longer a death sentence and can now be effectively managed through maintenance medications. In addition, more recent medical breakthroughs have brought to market pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) medications that can prevent at-risk populations, including those who could contract the virus through sexual contact or drug use, from ever getting HIV.

HHS estimates that more than one million people in the U.S. could benefit from taking PrEP medication, however only 100,000 actually have a prescription. That is why CVS Health is teaming up with HHS to help make PrEP medication more accessible and affordable through a new HHS program called Ready, Set, PrEP, which is a key component of the Ending the HIV Epidemic In America initiative, which aims to reduce the number of new HIV infections in the U.S. by 90 percent over the next 10 years.

How it works

The HHS Ready, Set, PrEP program provides at-risk and HIV-negative individuals who do not have prescription drug coverage access to PrEP medication at no cost.  In addition, the program is providing education and awareness materials to help individuals gain more information about PrEP and learn how to access the Ready, Set, PrEP program. Once approved, and with a valid PrEP prescription from a health care provider, individuals can fill the medication at a participating pharmacy, including CVS Pharmacy and CVS Pharmacy Specialty Services locations or by mail. CVS Health has donated prescription dispensing services to HHS as part of Ready, Set, PrEP program. Those interested can learn more about Ready, Set, PrEP and apply online at GetYourPrep.com or calling toll-free 855-447-8410.

CVS Health has donated prescription dispensing services to HHS as part of Ready, Set, PrEP program. Those interested can learn more about Ready, Set, PrEP and apply online at GetYourPrep.com.
Tweet this

Our enterprise commitment

This is one more way that CVS Health is working to prevent the spread of HIV and help those living with HIV better manage the virus and prevent disease progression.

This includes an ongoing partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to help Act Against AIDS, which brings mobile HIV screening and testing services to CVS Pharmacy locations throughout the country.

In addition, through the CVS Specialty HIV Care Management program, patients can receive whole-patient management and support from nurses specially trained in HIV care.Nurse support is available to CVS Caremark members whose plans including Accordant Care Management (including CareTeam Choice or CareTeam Advanced) Comprehensive, continuous care can help promote medication adherence, improve outcomes, and reduce overall health costs. Further, at several CVS Pharmacy Specialty Services locations in New York City, HIV patients can receive proactive outreach to improve adherence to and management of HIV medications. This includes face-to-face counseling and/or telephonic outreach for all new-to-therapy patients; refill reminders; and additional co-morbidity and financial support and assistance, as appropriate.

Across CVS Health, we help support the HIV/AIDS community every day. Through high-touch support, screening and care management services, we help those who are at at-risk for or living with HIV/AIDS on their path to better health.

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
0
Display Hero
Off

Connecting Rural Pediatric Patients to Mental Health Resources

Bottom of the article
Representatives from Aetna Better Health of West Virginia present a grant check to West Virginia University School of Medicine.
Aetna Better Health of West Virginia presents a $50,000 grant to the West Virginia University School of Medicine.

Our goal of building healthier communities by making health care local can be especially challenging when it comes to pediatric mental health access in rural communities.

But thanks to a $50,000 grant from Aetna Better Health of West Virginia to the West Virginia University School of Medicine, a new program will give the state’s pediatric health providers easier access to child and adolescent mental health resources.

The Pediatric Mental Health Telephone Access Line program, overseen by the school’s Department of Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry at the Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, will support frontline pediatricians, family medicine practitioners, and school health care providers by connecting children and adolescent psychiatrists by phone for informal consultation, advice and guidance.

Thanks to a $50,000 grant from Aetna Better Health of West Virginia to the West Virginia University School of Medicine, a new program will give the state’s pediatric health providers easier access to child and adolescent mental health resources.
Tweet this

“This generous gift from Aetna will be a gift to the children and the future of our state,” said Dr. Lauren W.M. Swager, a child and adolescent psychiatrist at WVU, who will serve as the clinical director of the Pediatric Mental Health telephone access line. “This program can help us build health and mental health access back into our most rural communities so our state’s children can continue to receive treatment in their pediatrician’s office.”

Todd White, CEO of Aetna Better Health of West Virginia, stated during the check presentation, “Being a trauma informed care organization, our Medicaid managed care health plan is honored to work with our partners at WVU to address the mental health needs of our state’s children.”

The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry recommends at least 47 practicing child and adolescent psychiatrists per 100,000 children and adolescents. Despite these guidelines, West Virginia claims only 9 practicing psychiatrists per 100,000 children and adolescents, with only 32 total practicing child and adolescent psychiatrists in the state.

For more information about CVS Health's efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

Representatives from Aetna Better Health of West Virginia present a grant check to West Virginia University School of Medicine.
Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
1
Display Hero
Off

The Importance of Bringing Diabetes Care into the Community

Bottom of the article

This article was written by Dr. Dan Knecht, Vice President of Health Strategy & Innovation at CVS Health.

1.5 million: That’s the number of Americans who are diagnosed with diabetes each year. 327 billion: That was the total cost of diagnosed diabetes in the United States in 2017, according to the American Diabetes Association.

These are big numbers, but they don’t tell the whole story. In addition to my day job as Vice President of Health Strategy and Innovation at CVS Health, I practice as a physician at Mount Sinai West Hospital in New York City. During my weekend rotations, I see firsthand the very real and negative impacts of uncontrolled diabetes on my patients. Diabetes can cause vision loss, kidney failure and neuropathic pain, in addition to accelerating and worsening cardiovascular disease.

Thankfully, the news is not all bad. As the number of people diagnosed with diabetes rises, so are the resources and treatment options available to them.

CVS Health recently partnered with Morning Consult to better understand the needs of people living with diabetes and the providers who deliver diabetes care. What we heard from patients and doctors is a desire to:

  • Expand access to local care
  • Better manage and predict out-of-pocket costs
  • Provide additional lifestyle support in the form of nutrition, exercise and social services

In honor of Diabetes Awareness Month, I sat down with fellow diabetes experts Dr. Steve Edelman, M.D., founder and director of Taking Control of Your Diabetes, and Joy Pape, R.N., a nationally known family nurse practitioner and certified diabetes educator, to discuss how we can address some of these needs through real action.

Watch our full CVS Health Live discussion above.

Read Dr. Knecht’s full article on LinkedIn.

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
3

Re-Training Providers to Achieve Proper Blood Pressure Measurement

Bottom of the article
A photo of a woman’s hand on a blood pressure cuff.

Getting your blood pressure checked is a familiar experience at the doctor’s office, but recent research suggests that it may not always be accurate.

According to the American Heart Association (AHA), nearly half of all U.S. adults have high blood pressure, which is a leading risk factor for heart attacks, strokes, and preventable death.  Accurate measurement of a patient’s blood pressure is vital to providing accurate diagnoses and quality care.https://www.ama-assn.org/system/files/2019-11/market-research-survey-bp-measurement.pdf

Given the importance of accurate blood pressure readings, clinical guidelines recommend that health care providers be periodically re-trained on proper BP measurement; however, recent market research conducted by the American Medical Association (AMA) and the AHA indicated this may not always be the case.

Based on this research, the AMA and AHA partnered with MinuteClinic, along with a leading health care organization and leading academic medical centers, to test a new e-learning module. The module, called Achieving Accuracy: BP Measurement, was designed to provide all front-line health care providers with access to consistent training on proper BP measurement and is now available for health care professionals through the AHA.

In the survey of more than two thousand health care providers, half of the physicians and physician assistants (PAs) who responded, and a third of nurse respondents, said they had not received BP measurement re-training since their initial training in school. However, there seems to be broad support among the survey respondents for BP refresher training, with three-quarters or more of the nurses, PAs, primary care providers and pharmacists surveyed noting that it should be required.

Some common BP measurement errors that can result in pushing a patient’s diagnosis from normal to elevated, include:

  • Taking a reading while a patient is sitting with their legs crossed, which can raise systolic pressure by 5 to 8 mm Hghttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17496470

  • Using the wrong cuff size, which can raise systolic pressure by approximately 10 mm Hghttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2911816

“Being able to test this new BP measurement re-training module with our providers on the front lines reinforces our long-standing commitment to advancing heart health and providing high quality care for our patients,” said David Fairchild, M.D., Chief Medical Officer, MinuteClinic. “Our providers appreciated the opportunity to be involved in this effort and we look forward to integrating this training into our clinical standards moving forward.”

A photo of a woman’s hand on a blood pressure cuff.
Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
2

Fighting Pneumonia With a Toothbrush: New Program Is Yielding Results

Bottom of the article
A woman smiling with a toothbrush in front of her mouth.

A first-of-its-kind CVS Health initiative to combat hospital-acquired pneumonia through better oral health is improving outcomes and receiving rave reviews from patients. To date, the Rush to Brush program has reached more than 8,000 Aetna members scheduled for one of 23 types of inpatient surgery with kits containing high-quality oral care products, education and a personalized ‘get well’ card.
The effort is designed to help reduce the incidence of hospital-acquired pneumonia, one of the most common and life-threatening infections hospitalized patients can contract.

“We want to shift the paradigm around oral health in hospitals. It’s actually more important to take care of your teeth and mouth when you go in for surgery, not less,” said Mary Lee Conicella, DMD, Chief Dental Officer for Aetna.

Dr. Conicella noted that oral care is critically important in the post-operative setting because the mouth is filled with bacteria. One study found colonization by disease-causing bacteria — especially those linked to pneumonia — in 90 percent of patients within 72 hours of being admitted to the hospital. Those bacteria don’t just stay in the mouth, however; they are often inadvertently inhaled into the lungs.https://www.aha.org/2018-03-29-what-your-hospital-doing-about-1-hospital-acquired-infectionhttps://msphere.asm.org/content/1/4/e00199-16https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4414413https://aricjournal.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s13756-016-0150-3

Brushing one’s teeth greatly reduces the population of bacteria in the mouth, according to nurse-researcher Dian Baker, Ph.D., professor at California State University, Sacramento.  “When patients brush their teeth, they’re basically taking their bacterial count from hundreds of millions down to just a few, and this greatly reduces their risk of pneumonia.”

Dr. Baker’s research inspired the Rush to Brush program, which is paying dividends in terms of clinical results, member satisfaction and reduced health care costs. To date, there has been about a 30 percent decrease in the incidence of pneumonia among members who received the Rush to Brush kit.Data based on early observations of pneumonia claims within 90 days of procedure for ~1,200 patients Additionally, estimates are that the program will yield approximately $75M in annual avoidable medical costs across Aetna’s commercial and Medicare business.

A note from a patient who took part in the Rush to Brush program.
A note from a patient who took part in the Rush to Brush program.

And members love it: Seventy percent took the kit with them to the hospital, and 95 percent have expressed positive feelings about the program and about Aetna. Members who received the kit have been effusive, saying the initiative “shows that Aetna is caring and considerate” and that “the fact that Aetna took a vested interested in my recovery meant so much.” One member noted that the kit “took the guess work out. All items were needed, all items were used — very important and useful.”

In addition to collaborating with Dr. Baker, Aetna worked with Johnson & Johnson and Colgate-Palmolive to outfit the kits with Colgate Total toothpaste, a high-quality toothbrush, Listerine Zero mouthwash and tips on good oral health.

The program illustrates unique ability of CVS Health and Aetna to use clinical and member data insights to unlock members’ health care needs, according to Daniel Knecht, M.D., Vice President of Health Strategy and Innovation for CVS Health. “Using those insights, we are then able to bring together the resources our members need on their road to recovery,” he added.

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
3

How a Trusted Partnership Helped One Type 2 Patient Live Healthier

Bottom of the article
A photo of a scale on wooden floor.

When Regina Wu first met Kenneth, she asked him about his diet and exercise — as CVS Health pharmacists routinely do with their patients. Kenneth, a 77-year-old man with diabetes and a sweet tooth who once weighed 286 pounds, said he often drank a liter of soda per day.

Regina immediately sensed a red flag.

“I know that soda is something people can become addicted to in a way,” she says. “It’s caffeinated, high in sugar, and people start to crave a soda fix. And soda is a big problem for blood sugar control.”

Research shows drinking sugary beverages like soda every day could increase a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 26 percent. For those already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, soda consumption can hamper their efforts to keep their blood sugar at an acceptable level.

That certainly was the case with Kenneth. He took his medications diligently, but his A1C reading was 10.1 percent. A normal A1C is less than 5.7 percent, and the goal for type 2 diabetes patients is to keep their A1C levels below 7 percent. Kenneth was struggling enough with his blood sugar that his doctor increased his insulin dosages.

Losing weight and changing eating habits can be challenging if the problem seems large and insurmountable. Regina saw an opportunity to focus on a small, manageable change: reduce Kenneth’s soda intake.

It’s these kinds of interactions that CVS Health had in mind when we created our Medication Therapy Management program. The program is designed to allow CVS pharmacists to engage one-on-one with patients, identifying any barriers in their treatment, recommending lifestyle changes, and creating an ongoing dialogue to ensure that patients are taking their medication and getting the follow-up care they need.

Regina and her colleagues frequently work with type 2 diabetes patients: Approximately 1 in 10 Americans — or about 30 million people — have type 2 diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. While the disease typically surfaces in people over age 45, young adults, teens and children are increasingly being diagnosed.

Regina spoke every few months with Kenneth, urging him to drink even just one less can of soda. Then, in 2018, Kenneth was hospitalized with an infection, and he was hospitalized a second time about a year later. After Kenneth came home from the hospital, he cut back to two Diet Cokes a day. By May 2019, his A1C reading was 8.6 percent, much closer to his target level, and he now weighs 240 pounds. He’s on a 50-gram-carbohydrates per day diet, walks more often, his blood pressure levels have improved and his medication dosages have been reduced. He has kicked the soda habit completely, and has become an advocate among his family members to minimize soda drinking.

“I see the pharmacist as part of the care engagement team,” Regina says. “It really takes a village and the pharmacist is someone patients can talk to in between doctor visits or after hospital discharge. They get to know me, I get to know them, and it becomes a friendship, and with that trust, we talk about how to make small changes that can add up.”

To learn more about our enterprise-wide approach to diabetes management and care, visit our Managing Diabetes with CVS Health page.

To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

A photo of a scale on wooden floor.
Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
0
Display Hero
Off

Diverse Supplier Spotlight: Planned Packaging of Illinois

Bottom of the article
A photo of PPOIC President and CEO Jason Robertson with members of the CVS Health team.
PPOIC President and CEO Jason Robertson (center) with members of the CVS Health team.

Our Supplier Diversity program works to integrate products and services from small and diverse businesses into our procurement processes.

These partnerships help us ensure that our products and services evolve to meet the needs of our customers, while also contributing to the economic growth of communities across the country.

In 2018, our spending with small and diverse businesses — including 398 owned by women and 373 owned by minorities — totaled $2.2 billion.

One of those businesses is Planned Packaging of Illinois (PPOIC), a worldwide distributor of shipping and packing materials that has been working with CVS Caremark, our pharmacy benefit manager, since 2007 and has since gone on to expand its support to other parts of CVS Health. Here, President and CEO Jason Robertson shares what it’s been like to be part of our Supplier Diversity program.

What services and/or products do you provide to CVS Health?
PPOIC is a just-in-time supplier of various packaging and shipping supplies, including gel packs, zip lock bags, stretch film, tape and corrugated boxes. PPOIC manages the daily inventory of these items and ships to CVS locations on an as-need basis. We store the product close to the various CVS locations to assure prompt delivery.

How has the partnership with CVS Health been beneficial to your business and the communities you serve?
The partnership has been beneficial on multiple levels, primarily that working with a Fortune 10 company lets everyone know we’re a capable supplier.

In addition, our growth with CVS Health has allowed PPOIC to expand and open two additional locations in North Carolina and Tennessee. These locations have provided jobs to primarily lower income individuals and two-strike felons who otherwise wouldn’t have been able to find employment.

PPOIC is proud to say that our North Carolina and Tennessee locations have an awesome employee retention rate, and we have seen tremendous positive impact on those employees’ lives.

Has working with CVS Health changed the way you do business?
PPOIC has had to change our internal business operations to support CVS. In doing so, we’ve become more efficient at customer care, customer response, and overall customer service. As we continue to grow together, we look forward to becoming a better, stronger, more efficient company.

Any business highlights that you attribute to working with CVS Health?
Working with the CVS Health Supplier Diversity team, PPOIC has had the pleasure of accompanying CVS Health to the White House to meet President Barack Obama in 2014, receiving a Ruby Award in 2015, and, most recently, I served as a panelist at the 2019 Rainbow Push Wall Street Project Economic Summit to talk about my company’s work with CVS Health.

CVS Health has provided visibility, credibility and a platform to promote our business unlike any other. In short, CVS Health has truly been a partner in mentoring, supporting and promoting PPOIC.

Hide Media Contacts (Sidebar)
No
Article
Hide Share
Off
"Likes" Count
1