During Nurses Month, we salute the vital work that nurses do every day

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This year, on the 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birth, National Nurses Month is celebrating the dedication of nurses in every interaction, every setting, every era, every day. Throughout May, CVS Health is also recognizing the thousands of nurses who work across our enterprise in this time of extraordinary challenge.

In honor of Nurses Month and in recognition of the vital work of nursing, CVS Health is making a $40,000 donation to Direct Relief to deliver protective gear and critical care medications to as many health care workers as possible.

Today, many nurses are found on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic. Others are contributing their expertise, experience and compassion behind the scenes. This includes some 10,000 nurses, nurse practitioners, LVNs and LPNs working for Aetna, MinuteClinic, CVS Caremark and Omnicare. All have been doing amazing work since COVID-19 began, including volunteering to oversee rapid testing in various areas or embracing new ways to treat patients during social distancing.

Sheryl Burke, Aetna Senior Vice President of Cross-Enterprise Strategic Innovation, recently praised nurses by saying, “You care for our customers and members like your own family through teaching, advocacy, listening and action. Your efforts have been nothing short of extraordinary and are well-deserving of our sincere gratitude.”

To learn more about the extraordinary work being done by our CVS Health nursing professionals, take a look at our Friday Pulse video recognizing Nurses Month. And please join us in celebrating nurses!

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

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Addressing food insecurity in local communities

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A volunteer (wearing a face mask) loads temperature-sensitive food into an insulated bag for distribution. A woman in a red coat observes him loading the insulated bag.

Families across the country are facing significant challenges as they work to keep people safe and healthy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Unfortunately, for many families, these health concerns are coming hand-in-hand with an unfamiliar worry: food insecurity. Lost jobs, reduced incomes and loss of access to school lunches have left many struggling with having enough to eat. Across the country, local nonprofits are stepping up with expanded services and innovative approaches to meet the sudden surge of need in their communities — and CVS Health is joining them to help. CVS Health and The CVS Health Foundation have provided more than $900,000 to organizations in local communities working to provide food to vulnerable populations, especially school-aged children, seniors, and the uninsured.

A $250,000 grant to Feeding America supported efforts to pack and deploy emergency food boxes to high-need areas across the country, including Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, New York and Washington. These boxes will help local food banks provide children, families, and seniors with the food and nutrition they need, even as the need for food assistance increases.

A volunteer arranges pre-packaged cooked meals, in sealed containers, on a tray for distribution.

Many other organizations have developed entirely new approaches to respond to the unique needs created by COVID-19 and CVS Health is proud to support this work in the communities we serve. In Kansas City, Missouri, Feed Northland Kids received a grant of $20,000 to develop Community Food Kits. With shelf-stable foods, these kits are provided to families through in-school pantries, which will help address food insecurity among school-age children. And in Austin, Texas, a $25,000 grant to the Central Texas Food Bank helped the organization shift to a drive-through model to allow clients to still receive food while ensuring safety for clients, staff, and volunteers. Safety is a top concern at many nonprofits; Community Servings in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, used a $15,000 grant to streamline operations and continue to distribute more than 2,000 food boxes in April, even without the assistance of the as many as 75 volunteers they previously relied on each day.

The COVID-19 pandemic has created an unprecedented need and continues to present unique challenges in meeting that need. At CVS Health, we’re proud to support the local organizations that are rising to the challenge to continue to feed their communities.

To stay up-to-date on the latest CVS Health Social Responsibility news and content, sign up for email news alerts.

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Meeting the nutritional needs of at-risk populations

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A female volunteer pushes a cart full of food donation while wearing a face mask.

People facing serious illnesses often have specific dietary needs to support their health. During the COVID-19 pandemic, those needs are compounded in many ways. CVS Health and the CVS Health Foundation are working to support local nonprofit organizations across the country to address the challenges presented by the pandemic, with a particular emphasis on organizations helping people on their path to better health by meeting their unique nutritional needs. We have awarded nearly $200,000 in grants to support 13 community organizations across the country, providing medically-tailored meals for individuals with serious illnesses.

One such organization is God’s Love We Deliver in New York City, a community particularly hard-hit by the pandemic. Through a grant of $15,000, our support will help them continue to deliver their medically tailored meals directly to clients’ homes while accommodating the changing needs created by COVID-19. CVS Health also awarded $100,000 to the California Food is Medicine Coalition, repurposing a portion of its three-year, $40 million commitment to invest in California’s health care delivery system to respond to the pandemic. This grant will support six local sites across the state as they expand their meal services in response to the pandemic.

A female volunteer, wearing a red coat, delivers a box containing food donations to female senior citizens, who is smiling while standing in the doorway of her house.

“The grant from CVS Health enables the six California Food is Medicine Coalition (CalFIMC) agencies to increase their services — delivering thousands of nutritious meals to low-income and medically fragile Californians who are sheltered in-place and at great risk of contracting COVID-19 and more vulnerable to complications and death,” said Ann Thrupp, Director of CalFIMC. “We greatly appreciate the support CVS Health has provided CalFIMC to help respond to urgent community food needs for highly vulnerable people during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Funding for these organizations, and others like them in highly impacted areas, meet a critical need. With the support of CVS Health, these local nonprofits will continue to navigate these challenges and ensure that nutritious food gets to the members of their communities who need it most.

To stay up-to-date on the latest CVS Health Social Responsibility news and content, sign up for email news alerts.

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COVID-19 local community support

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COVID-19 Response Fund


Food boxes and/or nutritional support


Local community support


Medically tailored meals


Senior services and food boxes

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Supporting relief efforts in our local communities

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A woman, wearing a face mask and gloves, handles produce in cardboard boxes.

For years, our purpose of helping people on their path to better health has guided us and remains the North Star on our journey to transform health care. Today, our purpose is more important than ever, as we work to address the most critical public health challenge in our lifetime — the COVID-19 pandemic. There are many individuals and communities in need and we are finding meaningful ways to support our employees, patients, customers and partners nationally and in the communities we serve.

With investments of more than $50 million in philanthropic support through CVS Health and the CVS Health and Aetna Foundations, we have focused our efforts on supporting the needs of the most vulnerable populations: school-aged children and their families, frontline workers, seniors, those who are underinsured or uninsured and, of course, our own colleagues. Our comprehensive approach includes:

  • COVID-19 resource action funds: CVS Health is providing local support grants, working with key leaders and partners at the local level to identify priority areas and organizations who can help with community resiliency efforts.

  • Food insecurity investments: As a result of the pandemic, many are struggling to access basic needs, including food and personal hygiene products. CVS Health has made $1 million in investments to address food insecurity and other community needs by distributing much-needed funds to local shelters and food banks. In addition, we’re making nearly $40M in product donations to community organizations around the country.

  • Outreach to underserved communities of color: African Americans have higher rates of underlying health conditions and chronic disease and data show COVID-19 is disproportionately impacting this community. CVS Health has launched a multi-faceted public education and awareness campaign aimed at closing the gap on misinformation and lack of information in minority communities, tapping into communications and marketing channels to help increase access to relevant resources and ensure more members of this at-risk community are informed and able to access the care they need.

  • Increasing telehealth and at-home health services: With shelter-in-place orders throughout the country, access to health care remains an important concern for all populations, but in particular those who are underinsured or uninsured. In response, the CVS Health Foundation is investing $2 million to support telehealth and expand capacity for free health clinics and community health partners to make these services more available and reliable for patients.

  • Frontline support: From health care workers and first responders to essential retail colleagues keeping store operations running each day, the safety and security of those on the frontline is critical.

    • Support for health care workers: CVS Health and the Aetna and CVS Health Foundations are donating nearly $2 million to support health care and clinical professionals access much-needed personal protective equipment (PPE) and behavioral health services. Grants to Americares, the American Nurses Foundation and Direct Relief will support access to PPE for health care professionals, including those in free clinics and community health centers around the country. In addition, these grants and additional funding for the Crisis Text Line will support behavioral health and mental wellbeing for frontline workers.

  • Workplace and employee support: We have committed to dedicate $1 million in value of colleague volunteerism to address the crisis to support services including clinical work, behavioral health support and peer-to-peer counseling. We also made a commitment to match up to $2 million in employee, board member and business partner contributions to the CVS Health Employee Relief Fund, which will make grants of up to $1,000 available to employees to address qualifying emergency needs related to the pandemic.

Read the full list of our partners supporting communities in need.

To stay up-to-date on the latest CVS Health Social Responsibility news and content, sign up for email news alerts.

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The Healing Power of Art

The Healing Power of Art
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A flower mural on the side of a CVS Pharmacy.
“Urbs in Horto” features Chicago’s city flower, the chrysanthemum, on the side of a CVS Pharmacy in the Lakeview neighborhood.
People standing in front of a flower mural.
Detroit mural artist Ouizi (center) dedicates “Urbs in Horto,” which translates to “City in a Garden” and takes its name from the City of Chicago’s official motto.

A new mural is on display and was recently dedicated on Mother’s Day to Chicago’s Lakeview neighborhood, thanks in part to CVS Health. The mural featuring beautiful flowers in bloom was created by Detroit artist Louise “Ouizi” Jones, and is painted on the exterior of a CVS Pharmacy on the 3600 block of North Southport Avenue.

“CVS Health is so delighted to have been a part of this project, and our involvement is an example of the ways that we are working to build healthier communities,” said Joe Haas, region manager at the CVS Pharmacy where the mural is located.

The mural is part of an effort to unveil 15 new public works of art across the Lakeview neighborhood of Chicago, fostering among its residents a stronger sense of pride, ownership and investment in their community.

“As a leading health care company, we like to say that health starts in the community,” added Haas. “And health is determined in part by the quality of our neighborhoods and the nature of our social interactions and relationships. This beautiful mural is a way to inspire, uplift and unite the Lakeview community, and contribute to its social health and vibrancy.”

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Community Heroes Bonus Grant Recipient Announced

Community Heroes Bonus Grant Recipient Announced
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Community Heroes logo

CVS Health and ABC15 have joined forces for the second year of Community Heroes, a program that provides over $30,000 in grants and gift cards to local schools and nonprofits in Arizona with children’s health and wellness programming.

The following ten organizations have been chosen to each receive a $2,500 Community Heroes grant and $250 CVS Pharmacy gift card. And, thanks to your votes, the Arizona Sustainability Alliance has been selected to receive the $5,000 bonus grant! Congratulations to all of our grantees.

  • One-N-Ten (http://onenten.org/) – Enhancing lives of LGBTQ youth and young adults through social services, outreach and health programming

  • Arizona Chapter of American Academy of Pediatrics (http://www.azaap.org/) – Improving the health of Arizona's children and supporting the pediatric professionals who care for them

  • Arizona Sustainability Alliance (www.azsustainabilityalliance.com) – Pioneering cutting-edge solutions for sustainability issues throughout the state and prioritizing low-income communities

  • Circle Cross Ranch K-8 STEM Academy (https://www.fusdaz.com/cc) – Ensuring all students obtain maximum academic growth and achievement

  • Down Syndrome Network, Inc. (www.dsnetworkaz.org) – Educating, supporting, and advocating for those in the community impacted by Down syndrome

  • Esperanca (https://www.esperanca.org/) – Improving health and providing hope for families in the poorest communities through sustainable disease prevention, education, and treatment

  • Fountain Hills Youth Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition (www.fhcoalition.org) – Collaborating with the community to reduce youth substance abuse

  • Friendly House, Inc. (www.friendlyhouse.org) – Empowering Arizona communities through education and human services

  • HopeKids, Inc. (www.hopekids.org) – Providing a powerful, unique support community for families who have a child with cancer or other life-­threatening medical condition

  • Tucson Unified School District (http://www.tusd1.org) – Where students love to learn, teachers love to teach, and people love to work

2018 Voting is Now Closed

One-N-Ten
9%

(10 Votes)

Arizona Chapter of American Academy of Pediatrics
1%

(1 Votes)

Arizona Sustainability Alliance
33%

(37 Votes)

Circle Cross Ranch K-8 STEM Academy
7%

(8 Votes)

Down Syndrome Network, Inc.
4%

(4 Votes)

Esperanca
10%

(11 Votes)

Fountain Hills Youth Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition
2%

(2 Votes)

Friendly House, Inc.
2%

(2 Votes)

HopeKids, Inc.
33%

(37 Votes)

Tucson Unified School District
1%

(1 Votes)

Voting is now closed
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NAFC Grant Spotlight: Health Brigade

NAFC Grant Spotlight: Health Brigade
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Health Brigade logo

CVS Health Foundation has partnered with the National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics (NAFC) on a multi-year program of awarding grants to increase access to care, improve health outcomes and lower overall health care costs across the country.

One of the 2018 grantees is Health Brigade, a Richmond, Virginia-based clinic that has been providing services to the community for nearly 50 years.

The Communities Served by Health Brigade

Health Brigade patients are typically uninsured or significantly underinsured and do not earn more than 200 percent of the federal poverty level. In 2017, the clinic provided primary care services to more than 1,600 patients over the course of more than 5,700 visits. These included treatment for chronic illnesses, women’s health services, and preventive care.

Health Brigade is also committed to aiding marginalized populations, including people of color, LGBTQ individuals, and those who have recently been incarcerated. In 2017, the clinic connected with more than 18,500 individuals in these populations through various outreach activities.

As part of Health Brigade’s efforts to treat the “whole person,” the clinic has made efforts to increase the accessibility and quality of mental health services available to low-income patients. At the clinic, mental health and wellness patients have access to individual and group counseling, behavioral health services, smoking cessation services, and various specialty services.

Addressing the Health Care Needs of the “Whole Person”

To help balance access to health care and address the realities of poverty, Health Brigade has adopted a patient-centered health-care model for low-income adults, offering access to affordable, comprehensive health services. This model seeks to address the needs of the “whole person.” Primary care patients with both physical and mental health needs are treated by a multi-disciplinary team of primary care, mental health and public health providers who collaborate in real time to deliver care, educate patients and provide support services necessary to improve and maintain health.

How the CVS Health Grant Has Helped

The CVS Health Foundation grant given to Health Brigade is helping the clinic enhance access to and coordination of care by enabling the hiring of a medical social worker to join the integrated care team. The medical social worker assists patients in navigating health care and social service systems and links patients to crucial resources, such as safe housing, healthy foods, employment and transportation that can significantly influence a patient’s overall health and health behaviors. 

One Health Brigade Patient’s Story

Hope, a 47-year-old African American woman with three children and one grandchild, arrived at Health Brigade through a referral from a shelter for individuals who have experienced domestic violence, sexual violence or human trafficking. At her initial appointment, Hope was afraid to be in the waiting room, particularly around men, and to disclose information about her past.

When the Health Brigade medical social worker met with Hope, she described years of abuse, homelessness, financial insecurity and toxic relationships. Hope hid from the outside world and came out of her home only for health care appointments. Over the course of an initial assessment that lasted more than an hour, it was discovered that Hope did not have access to food, housing, money or her needed prescriptions.

The medical social worker provided intensive case management for Hope for more than a year. Hope now receives disability, Medicaid and nutrition assistance. She is in an apartment with her daughter and is able to go out in public without fear. Since receiving Medicaid, Hope was linked to a therapist and a psychiatrist in the community and receives regular ongoing therapy. She no longer has to rely on free clinic services for her health and mental health care. For every patient like Hope who obtains stable services in the community, Health Brigade frees capacity for the many still needing aid. 

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Tackling the Opioid Epidemic at the Community Level

Tackling the Opioid Epidemic at the Community Level
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With a presence in nearly 10,000 communities across the United States, CVS Health recognizes the importance of fighting the opioid epidemic at the local level, with local solutions.

That’s why, among the many ways CVS Health is working to mitigate the epidemic, we have committed funding to organizations across the country to support prevention, treatment and recovery efforts.

Supporting Community Health Centers Nationwide

In September 2017, CVS Health announced an enterprise-wide, multi-pronged approach to help find solutions to the national opioid abuse epidemic. Those efforts included the nationwide expansion of our drug disposal collection program, an increase in the availability of naloxone without a prescription and the enhancement of our pain medication utilization management program to ensure prescription opioids are used properly.

Also included was a $2-million commitment by the CVS Health Foundation, to the National Association of Community Health Centers (NACHC), to increase access to medication-assisted treatment and other recovery services at community health centers around the country. To-date, we have funded more than 20 community health centers through this program.

Among the recipients of that grant support were:

  • Total Health Care in Baltimore, a community health center dedicated to supporting opioid addiction recovery was awarded $85,000 to develop and implement a trauma informed care model which will increase participation in its substance abuse treatment program.

  • The Greater Lawrence Family Health Center, in Lawrence, Massachusetts, received $80,000 to develop a protocol to train their team on the screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment (SBIRT) approach to addiction. SBIRT is an evidence-based practice used to identify, reduce and prevent misuse and abuse of alcohol and drugs.

  • Four California community health centers received a total of $330,000 to increase access to opioid addiction treatment and recovery services.

Expanding Community-Level Support

In addition, CVS Health has awarded grants to several other non-profit organizations nationwide that are tackling this public health challenge.

These grant recipients include:

  • Three New Hampshire non-profit organizations received $60,000 in grants to address and prevent opioid abuse.

  • New Jersey-based Morris Country Prevention Is Key was given funding from CVS Health to host two peer recovery specialist training cohorts. The training provided 55 specialists the opportunity to share knowledge in one-on-one, group, emergency room and correctional facility interventions, as well as become law enforcement response assistants throughout the state.

  • In Ohio, two clinics – Neighborhood Family Practice in Cleveland and Rocking Horse Children’s Health Center in Springfield – received a total of $100,000 for programs supporting patients and families struggling with substance abuse.

  • Two Arizona non-profit organizations, ICAN and El Rio Health, received a total of $115,000 from CVS Health to support their prevention and medication education programs.

  • And in CVS Health’s home community of Rhode Island, where the company’s corporate headquarters are located, opioid-related grants have been awarded to the United Way, Community Care Alliance, the Rhode Island Disaster Medical Assistance Team, RI PBS, and Bradley Hospital.

CVS Health is committed to helping put an end to the national opioid abuse epidemic, in part by connecting those who are struggling with addiction with the resources they need to regain good health. In supporting community partners through grants like these, CVS Health is working to expand access to the community-level prevention, treatment and recovery programs that serve as the frontline in this crisis.

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CVS Health Announces $100 Million Community Commitment Following Acquisition Of Aetna

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Demonstrates newly-combined company's commitment to building healthier communities

Draws on a legacy of community investment and local support to enhance public health

WOONSOCKET, R.I., Jan. 14, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Following its completed acquisition of Aetna, CVS Health (NYSE: CVS) today announced a $100 million commitment to making community health and wellness central to the newly combined company's charge for a better world. The new Building Healthier Communities initiative, which will be funded over five years through the combined company as well as the CVS Health Foundation and Aetna Foundation, builds upon the outstanding tradition of community investment by both organizations and mobilizes their scale, combined capabilities and resources behind a unified strategy to deliver a measurable impact on the health of communities across the United States.

"We believe the path to better health and a better world can be reached by creating a whole new health care model that's more local, affordable, and easier to use. And by strengthening our local support and community engagement, we can further improve the health of our communities," said Larry J. Merlo, President and CEO, CVS Health, during a speech today at the National Press Club in Washington D.C. "Our new commitment builds upon the exemplary track records of CVS Health and Aetna in supporting community-based organizations to ensure they have the most effective tools, resources and solutions to accelerate the improvement of health care for individuals and families across the country."

Through Building Healthier Communities, CVS Health will invest $20 million annually across three funding categories to support a range of initiatives and non-profit organizations. These include:

Improving Local Access to Affordable Quality Care

Building on its local impact over the past decade, CVS Health will expand its Project Health campaign to target more underserved and underinsured communities beginning in 2019, with an aim of reaching more at-risk populations with free health and wellness screenings. Project Health offers a no-cost comprehensive health assessment, including blood pressure, Body Mass Index (BMI), glucose and total cholesterol screenings, which can detect early risks for chronic conditions like diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. Since it was founded in 2006, Project Health has delivered more than $127 million in free health care services to nearly 1.7 million Americans.

The expansion of Project Health will also do more to screen for social determinants of health that affect personal health and communities. About 60 percent of life expectancy is driven by behavioral, social and environmental factors including family, education, housing, and access to fresh food.1 Project Health events have a proven track record of improving patient engagement and ultimately, healthier outcomes. More than 87% of patients who attend Project Health events report following-up with their primary care physician and were significantly more likely to proactively discuss their blood pressure, BMI and blood sugar levels, according to the company's own metrics.

In addition, Project Health events provide opportunities for our charitable partners to drive community members who seek access to care. All events are promoted among local organizations like the LGBT Center in Los Angeles, the YMCA of Metro Atlanta, ACCESS Michigan in Detroit, and The NAACP in Houston.

Through its Building Healthier Communities initiative, CVS Health will continue to make strategic investments that enable access for more people to local resources like Meals on Wheels, free clinics and community health centers. Through grant funding in 2019 to more than 100 free clinics and community health centers in the communities we serve, CVS Health can help address these social and health disparities.

Impacting Public Health Challenges

CVS Health will make significant investments in support of innovative approaches to managing chronic disease, including diabetes, heart disease and high blood pressure. About 60 percent of Americans have at least one chronic disease, which accounts for 86 percent of health care spending.2 Funding will support partnership organizations uniquely positioned to tackle these public health challenges, including the American Cancer Society, American Lung Association and American Diabetes Association. Through best-in-class organizations like these, we can increase our local reach and meet people where they are. For example, we're teaming up with the American Heart Association with a goal to improve the blood pressure of 3.5 million women by providing increased access to blood pressure screening and diagnostic tests. Through the initiative, more than $4 million has already been invested to add blood pressure kiosks in highly-trafficked, community-based locations in cities including: Baltimore, MD; Charlotte, NC; College Station, TX; Fort Worth, TX; Houston, TX; Kansas City, MO; Lancaster, PA; New York City, NY Raleigh, NC; Twin Cities, MN; and Washington, D.C.

At the same time, CVS Health will continue to help tackle the nation's opioid crisis as part of its new commitment. Funding will be directed to organizations that are innovating in the area of addiction treatment. For example, we're partnering with Easterseals to prevent and mitigate prescription drug abuse among our nation's veterans. Easterseals affiliates are in communities nationwide and are immersed in providing community-based care, including mental health and recovery services, for our nation's veterans, their families and caregivers. Both CVS Health and Aetna have responded to this national epidemic in a variety of ways. Aetna was the first national insurer to waive co-pays for naloxone, the drug that reverses opioid overdoses. And in 48 states, CVS Health is dispensing naloxone with no individual prescription needed. Both companies also took the step to strengthen management of opioid prescriptions. As a result of these efforts, CVS Health has seen a nearly 72 percent drop in covered opioid prescriptions that go beyond a seven-day supply.

In addition, CVS Health's leadership in helping youth lead tobacco-free lives will continue as part of the company's Building Healthier Communities strategy. The company's signature program, "Be The First" will continue to fund universities, women's colleges, community colleges and Historically Black Colleges & Universities (HBCUs) to go tobacco-free; e-cigarette education; tobacco control and healthy behavior programming through national and local partnerships including, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, CATCH Global Foundation, CDC, and Truth Initiative with a goal of helping deliver the nation's first tobacco-free generation.

Partnering with Local Communities

Through the Aetna Foundation and its collaboration with U.S. News & World Report, CVS Health will support the Healthiest Communities rankings, a groundbreaking report that evaluates the health of nearly 3,000 communities nationwide across 10 categories, from education and population health to infrastructure and economy. In addition to assessing which communities offer their citizens the greatest opportunity to live a productive, healthy life, the rankings, which were first released in 2018, identify the best approaches for improving public health that can be shared and implemented across the country.

While the Healthiest Communities rankings help identify critical needs of individual communities, the CVS Health Foundation and Aetna Foundation will continue supporting community-driven solutions that address social determinants of health and help make improvements in important public health issues. By supporting organizations that are dedicated to enhancing important factors that contribute to the well-being of communities, such as safe outdoor spaces, affordable transportation, and access to fresh fruits and vegetables, the company's philanthropic efforts can have a significant impact on health issues such as the opioid epidemic, food insecurity and inequities in health care. The communities supported by Aetna Foundation grantees are already seeing positive outcomes, such as bringing new healthy food access points to within a mile of more than 1.6 million people and revitalizing public spaces to create new walkable destinations within a half-mile of more than 527,000 people.

These outcomes are due to the work being done by community-based organization who are working at the neighborhood level to deliver local impact. Organizations such as: Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition of Broward County, Florida, which tackles high rates of racial/ethnic disparities in maternal/child health; FoodLab Detroit, which is focused on strengthening Detroit's regional food system by creating a new food economy; and Go Austin/Vamos Austin, which promotes resident-led improvements to healthy foods and living environments. We will also expand initiatives utilizing community assets such as barbershops to improve hypertension in African American communities, launch new partnerships for multi-generational learning to improve health outcomes in high risk communities, and facilitate cross-sector collaboration among key stakeholders at the city and county levels.

In addition, CVS Health and Aetna employees have pledged a minimum $10 million in value of volunteer hours each year, offering their time and expertise to creating healthier, more sustainable communities. CVS Health and Aetna support these efforts through a robust volunteer platform where colleagues can volunteer regularly, and get involved with a range of local partner organizations to help address unmet health and social needs.

"Health starts at the community level. By combining the capabilities and philanthropic resources of CVS Health and Aetna, we can engage and empower local communities to address their unique health care needs and make a real difference," added Merlo. "Ultimately, we're aspiring to deliver better health care which in turn creates better communities and a better world."

About CVS Health

CVS Health is the nation's premier health innovation company helping people on their path to better health. Whether in one of its pharmacies or through its health services and plans, CVS Health is pioneering a bold new approach to total health by making quality care more affordable, accessible, simple and seamless. CVS Health is community-based and locally focused, engaging consumers with the care they need when and where they need it. The Company has more than 9,800 retail locations, approximately 1,100 walk-in medical clinics, a leading pharmacy benefits manager with approximately 93 million plan members, a dedicated senior pharmacy care business serving more than one million patients per year, expanding specialty pharmacy services, and a leading stand-alone Medicare Part D prescription drug plan. CVS Health also serves an estimated 39 million people through traditional, voluntary and consumer-directed health insurance products and related services, including a rapidly expanding Medicare Advantage offering. This innovative health care model increases access to quality care, delivers better health outcomes and lowers overall health care costs. Find more information about how CVS Health is shaping the future of health at https://www.cvshealth.com.

Contacts:

Media Contacts:
Joe Goode, Joseph.Goode@CVSHealth.com
O: 401-770-9820; M: 781-799-6048

Ethan Slavin, SlavinE@aetna.com
O: 860-273-6095

Investor Contact:
Michael P. McGuire, Michael.McGuire@CVSHealth.com
O: 401-770-4050

Endnotes

1 "Beyond Health Care: The Role of Social Determinants in Promoting Health and Health Equity," Kaiser Family Foundation. Accessed at https://www.kff.org/disparities-policy/issue-brief/beyond-health-care-the-role-of-social-determinants-in-promoting-health-and-health-equity/.

2 "Health and Economic Costs of Chronic Diseases," U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/about/costs/index.htm

SOURCE CVS Health

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