From homelessness to health: Our commitment

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A photo of Kevin Duvall in his home.
After caring for his mother and losing his family home, Kevin Duvall faced a decade of homelessness. Today, as a resident of Sequoia Commons, he has security and a future.

Kevin Duvall was homeless. Today, thanks to CVS Health’s commitment to affordable housing, he has a home and a future.
 
After years of homelessness, food insecurity, and even drinking from gutters, 59-year-old Kevin Duvall still feels overwhelmed knowing he can cook his own food, pour a clean glass of water and eat a healthy meal in his own home.

Kevin cared for his mother for years and took a reverse mortgage on their house to make ends meet. When the bank reclaimed his home, and possessions, after her death, Kevin carried two photo albums in a backpack through a decade of homelessness.

Today, he lives at Sequoia Commons — a 66-unit affordable rental community in California’s San Joaquin Valley funded in part by CVS Health and built by Self-Help Enterprises – for residents who face challenges such as homelessness or chronic illness. “It's changed everything to have a place to live,” he says. “I was ready to give up.”

An aerial photo of the Sequoia Commons housing development neighborhood.
CVS Health contributed 20 million dollars towards the 66 low-income units at Sequoia Commons — one of many housing investments across the country. The facility includes on-site resident services such as job training and health and medical services.
A photo of Keli Savage, Sr. Director Investment Strategy, and Chet Uma, CEO Aetna Better Health of CA., visiting Sequoia Commons for the grand opening February 14, 2020.
Keli Savage, Sr. Director Investment Strategy, and Chet Uma, CEO Aetna Better Health of CA., visit Sequoia Commons for the grand opening February 14, 2020.

Investing beyond the pharmacy

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 60% of a person’s life expectancy is influenced by everyday activities that take place outside the doctor’s office. These social determinants of health include access to affordable housing, reliable transportation, quality schools and health care.

“Among other things, research shows that a safe, secure home has a positive impact on behavioral health, childhood asthma and birth outcomes.” says Dr. Garth Graham, Vice President of Community Health and Impact at CVS Health. Social determinants of health, he says, can vary not just by zip code, but by destinations as specific as a neighborhood block or bus stop.

CVS Health is committed to reaching beyond its retail pharmacy counters to build healthy communities. “In 2019 we invested $67 million in affordable housing to create over 2,200 affordable homes in six states, including California,” explains Keli Savage, head of Impact Investment Strategy. “In 2020, we have committed an additional $75 million in investments.”

CVS Health is also collaborating with Self-Help and community partners to provide on-site resident services including English as a Second Language (ESL) classes, job training and on-site health and medical services like flu shots, screenings and health clinics.

Kevin understands better than most the inextricable link between affordable housing and the opportunity to live a healthier life. He says his new home enables him to be stable, self-sufficient and to care for his own health challenges as he ages. “I have a place to put my photo albums now,” he says, with pride.

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

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Transforming kidney care

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An estimated 37 million Americans live with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and nearly 700,000 have end stage renal disease (ESRD). Treatment can be challenging and costly for both patients and payers. In fact, dialysis alone costs Medicare approximately $120 billion annually. Yet, despite the enormous cost, patient outcomes are poor, with nearly one in six dialysis patients dying in the first year after starting treatment.United States Renal Data System. 2019 USRDS annual data report: Epidemiology of kidney disease in the United States. National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD, 2019.

At CVS Health, we are working to fundamentally transform the treatment paradigm for the millions of patients with CKD and ESRD through CVS Kidney Care, a CVS Health company. Specifically, our CKD management program is focused on early identification of kidney disease, targeted patient engagement and ongoing education to help slow disease progression.

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Earlier Identification and Better Patient Education

Many people who have kidney disease don’t know it. In fact, in the U.S., 43 percent of those with severely reduced kidney function are not aware that they have chronic kidney disease. By promoting early diagnosis, we will work to help delay the onset of dialysis and avoid emergency hospitalization, which is one of the biggest drivers of cost in kidney care.

Our CKD care management program is focused on helping people understand their condition, delay the need for dialysis, and make confident treatment decisions when the time comes. For more information, visit the CVS Kidney Care website.

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There is hope. A system that pays for kidney health, rather than kidney sickness, would produce much better outcomes, often at a lower cost, for millions of Americans.

Alex M. Azar III, U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services

Aligned with HHS Priorities

In 2019, an executive order aimed at improving kidney care helped launch a new Advancing Kidney Health initiative of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This marked an important step forward in kidney care as the administration pledged to double the number of kidney transplants performed in the U.S and reduce ESRD kidney failure by 25 percent by 2030 through better education and care during early forms of the disease. Furthermore, the administration wants 80 percent of newly diagnosed people with kidney failure to receive a transplant or move from clinic-based dialysis to less expensive and more effective in-home care by 2025.

Our CVS Kidney Care focus aligns with the core objectives of this new initiative, and uniquely positions us to help advance and support the administration’s directives to improve early detection of and expand treatment options for kidney care. Across our CVS Health enterprise, we are committed to transforming the health care system to better meet the needs of patients and reduce overall costs. Our unique approach to kidney care is one way that we are doing this as we work to help more people on their path to better health. 

Visit the CVS Kidney Care website to learn more about our offerings.

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Making communities stronger by volunteering time, talent and resources

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Just one example of how we’re making communities stronger by encouraging employees to volunteer their time, talent and resources to local organizations.
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Working part-time, Maria Martinez does her best to support her two kids, but sometimes it’s not enough to make ends meet. After falling behind on her gas bill, she needed help.

That’s when she attended a “Keep the Power On” utility clinic and connected with a group of CVS Health lawyers working pro bono to help Hartford residents struggling to pay their utility bills — just one example of how we’re making communities stronger by encouraging employees to volunteer their time, talent and resources to local organizations.

“Being a lawyer, you are an advocate, so instead of advocating for the company, I'm now advocating for an individual,” says Jen Corvo, CVS Health counsel. “Pro bono programs like this are great because we are meeting people at something that really does affect their daily life.”

Watch the video to see how we’re reaching out and helping community members like Maria.

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

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CVS Health Invests $67 Million in Affordable Housing Across the Country in 2019

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Company plans to exceed that amount in 2020 to help address housing insecurities and promote community health improvement

WOONSOCKET, R.I. — To help provide support to underserved populations across the country, CVS Health (NYSE: CVS) invested $67 million in affordable housing in 2019. The investments helped to create more than 2,200 affordable homes with supportive services for individuals and families across 24 cities in six states.

CVS Health's investments in affordable housing as well as collaborations with community groups in these areas help provide support for at-risk individuals. Through the 2019 investments, nearly 300 Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH) units will be made available for residents who are victims of domestic violence, experiencing homelessness, affected by chronic illness, requiring behavioral health and addiction treatment or are challenged by similar life and health situations. There are 450 additional units dedicated to housing seniors, 59 units reserved specifically for veterans and their families, and 38 units dedicated to housing American Indian individuals and their families.

"Providing affordable housing options to people who are facing significant challenges can be their first step on a path to better health," said Karen S. Lynch, Executive Vice President, CVS Health and President, Aetna Business Unit. "However, we understand that more support is often needed - that is why we work with community organizations to provide access to services such as independent living skills, cooking and nutrition, financial literacy, health information classes, resident outreach and engagement, client centered treatment plans and social support."

Efforts to address housing insecurity are a core part of Destination: Health, a series of CVS Health business programs focused on helping people improve their health outside of a clinical setting.

Since 1997, CVS Health and Aetna, a CVS Health company, have combined to invest more than $1 billion in affordable housing and community investments. These investments have led to the building and renovation of over 93,000 affordable rental units, positively impacting hundreds of thousands of low-income individuals, families, and seniors.

Commitment to California

While CVS Health has invested in affordable housing in different locations across the country, California is a specific focus of the investment strategy.

"We have made more than $160 million of affordable housing investments in California over the past twenty years, including nearly $50 million in the past two years alone," said Kristen Miranda, California Market President for Aetna, a CVS Health company. "These investments are helping to address the unique needs of residents in California, helping to improve health at both the individual and community level. We will continue to look for opportunities where we can invest to support those who need it the most throughout the state."

Recent examples of investments in California include:

  • In February 2020, in partnership with CREA, LLC, CVS Health is closing an $8.1M commitment to finance the development of 85 affordable housing units in collaboration with the East LA Community Corporation (ELACC) and New Directions for Veterans (New Directions). 63 units are reserved for people experiencing homelessness (44 specifically for veterans). Through our work with ELACC and New Directions, residents will have access to services such as after school tutoring, employment services, substance use treatment, legal assistance, peer support and advocacy and medication management.

  • On February 14, 2020, CVS Health is sponsoring the grand opening of Sequoia Commons in Goshen, CA, a 66-unit low-income community made possible by funding support from CVS Health, the California Department of Housing and Community Development, the Federal Home Loan Bank of San Francisco, Red Stone Equity Partners and Pacific Western Bank. CVS Health is collaborating with the developer, Self Help Enterprises, to help provide a robust program of on-site resident services, including job training, health and medical services, financial training and homebuyer education.

  • In December 2019, CVS Health closed on a $25 million commitment to Red Stone Equity 2019 CA Regional Fund, L.P., an investment fund designed to construct and/or rehabilitate over 500 units of affordable housing in five cities throughout California. These units will be offered to a wide range of individuals, including those requiring mental health services, seniors, as well as veterans and their families.

  • In November 2019, CVS Health sponsored the grand opening of Bishop Street Studios in San Luis Obispo, CA, an abandoned orphanage that was transformed into 33 affordable Permanent Supportive Housing units for individuals with mental health issues through funding support from CVS Health, the Transitions-Mental Health Association (THMA) and the Housing Authority of San Luis Obispo.

Investments Across the Country

In addition to California, CVS Health's 2019 affordable housing investments were spread across the country to locations in Georgia, Hawaii, New Hampshire, Oregon and Texas. In 2020, CVS Health expects to surpass 2019 investment totals and the number of states impacted, with $25 million committed to investments in Ohio and another $50 million in investments currently being underwritten coast to coast.

Some of these investments will have grand openings during 2020, helping local community members with access to new affordable housing options. Examples include the following investments made in partnership with Hunt Capital Partners, LLC:

  • Mistletoe Station in Fort Worth, TX, a new 74-unit affordable housing development including units set aside for veterans, farm workers, women experiencing violence, persons with disabilities, HIV/AIDS diagnoses or who are experiencing homeless.

  • Union Landing Apartments in Union City, GA, a new 240-unit development helping Fulton County's low to moderate income individuals and families access affordable housing and services.

"We recognize the strong connection between housing and health," said Keli Savage, Head of Impact Investment Strategy, CVS Health. "We are focused on cultivating the right relationships with community organizations across the country and combining strategic investments in housing with services to address the specific needs of our communities."

About CVS Health

CVS Health is the nation's premier health innovation company helping people on their path to better health. Whether in one of its pharmacies or through its health services and plans, CVS Health is pioneering a bold new approach to total health by making quality care more affordable, accessible, simple and seamless. CVS Health is community-based and locally focused, engaging consumers with the care they need when and where they need it. The Company has approximately 9,900 retail locations, approximately 1,100 walk-in medical clinics, a leading pharmacy benefits manager with approximately 102 million plan members, a dedicated senior pharmacy care business serving more than one million patients per year and expanding specialty pharmacy services. CVS Health also serves an estimated 38 million people through traditional, voluntary and consumer-directed health insurance products and related services, including rapidly expanding Medicare Advantage offerings and a leading standalone Medicare Part D prescription drug plan. The Company believes its innovative health care model increases access to quality care, delivers better health outcomes and lowers overall health care costs. Find more information about how CVS Health is shaping the future of health at https://www.cvshealth.com.

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Ethan Slavin
860-273-6095
SlavinE@aetna.com

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The Impact of Our Investments

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Officials cut the ribbon on a mixed-income community in Georgia.
Our recent investments have included Gateway Pointe, a mixed-income community in Georgia that celebrated its ribbon-cutting (above) in the fall of 2019.

Since 1997, CVS Health and Aetna, a CVS Health company, have combined to invest more than $1 billion in affordable housing and community investments. These investments have led to the building and renovation of over 93,000 affordable rental units, positively impacting hundreds of thousands of low-income individuals, families, and seniors. The company’s efforts to address housing insecurity are a core part of Destination: Health, a series of CVS Health business programs dedicated to helping people improve their health outside of a clinical setting. CVS Health is continuing to make significant investments in affordable housing across the country.

With a continued focus on addressing housing insecurity in underserved and at-risk populations, CVS Health is looking forward to further cultivating invaluable relationships with community organizations and combining its strategic investments in housing with services to address the specific needs of individuals and communities across the country.

To learn more about the impact of our investments, read our press release and the local coverage below highlighting the ways we’re making a positive impact in communities nationwide.

Officials cut the ribbon on a mixed-income community in Georgia.
Our recent investments have included Gateway Pointe, a mixed-income community in Georgia that celebrated its ribbon-cutting (above) in the fall of 2019.
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Building lifelong connections for children in foster care

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Groups of child welfare professionals work as teams.
Groups of Kansas Department for Children and Families' child welfare professionals and other child welfare professionals from agencies across the state work as teams at the Family Finding Boot Camp. Credit: Evert Nelson/The Topeka Capital-Journal
Kevin Campbell addresses about 100 social workers during an event.
Kevin Campbell, founder of the Center for Family Finding and Youth Connectedness, trains about 100 Kansas social workers during the Family Finding Boot Camp. Credit: Evert Nelson/The Topeka Capital-Journal

For many of us, the concept of finding family members often involves searching on a genealogy site or signing up for an at-home DNA testing kit. There is an element of fun and intrigue, inspiring individuals to better understand their family roots. For many young children and teens in foster care, however, locating family members isn’t a pastime, but a necessity for daily living. These connections will help them grow and thrive.

Recently, more than 100 child welfare professionals in Kansas participated in the Family Finding Boot Camp, led by child and family welfare expert Kevin Campbell. Aetna Better Health of Kansas, the Kansas Department of Children and Families (DCF), and Casey Family Programs sponsored the four-day event. As the founder of the Family Finding model, Campbell spoke about key methods and strategies to locate and engage relatives of children currently living in out-of-home care. The goal of Family Finding is to connect each child with a family or a “network” (blood relative or not), so that every child may benefit from the lifelong connections that a family would typically provide.

Healing Children and Families

Over the years of developing Family Finding, Campbell found that most foster children have a large extended family, and if they could connect with five to eight adults who would make a “permanent relational commitment” to the child, it could change outcomes significantly.

“The training is really about how do you heal children who have had such harm done to them? And how do you heal the whole family? Because this kind of generational experience has to stop somewhere.” — Kevin Campbell
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“The training is really about how do you heal children who have had such harm done to them? And how do you heal the whole family? Because this kind of generational experience has to stop somewhere,” said Campbell.

Kellie Hans Reid, foster care coordinator with Aetna Better Health of Kansas, affirmed, “Research shows that traumatic experiences affect children’s health, like metabolic and cardiac health. We also know that we build our lifelong health in childhood. Yet, if we start early enough, there is so much we can do to alleviate the effects of childhood trauma, prevent reoccurrences, and hopefully improve long-term health and disease outcomes.”

Expanding Safety Networks

During the boot camp, Campbell empowered attendees with information on how each of them can help extend the overall safety networks of the children they work with — meaning family, friends or acquaintances that genuinely care about the child and who can serve as a relational resource. Campbell also discussed how to facilitate a community of unconditional love and healing to combat and lower the toxic stress and loneliness these children and their families are experiencing — improving mental and physical health outcomes.

Organized into 27 teams, social welfare professionals collaborated throughout the week to apply the Family Finding model to their current cases. Based on a series of criteria, they prioritized the children who were their biggest worry. By the end of the training, participants reported locating an average of 19 contacts per child, for a total of 500 contacts across all teams combined — this was an increase of 84 percent from the beginning of the week. This number broke the American record for the average number of relatives identified in a Family Finding Boot Camp, which typically averages 14 connections per child.

Key Takeaways

Attendees expressed how the boot camp training had an immediate impact on their practice with families and their individual outlook. Sample words used to describe experiences included: hopeful, moved, excited, inspired, connected, empowered, optimistic, transformative, motivated, challenged, refreshed, and appreciative, among others.

Looking to the Future

“This work has huge implications for connection, healing, improved health outcomes and combating loneliness in Kansas and beyond, potentially reducing the reliance on foster homes and congregate care,” said Josh Boynton, a member of the Medicaid Growth team focused on complex populations strategy. 

David Livingston, CEO of Aetna Better Health of Kansas, added, “This week’s Family Finding training represented preliminary efforts to empower local communities to take action and create meaningful changes in the lives of young individuals. As we look ahead to 2020 planning efforts, our goal is to continue investing both significant time and resources to improve the health and wellbeing of children and their families throughout Kansas.”

About Aetna Better Health of Kansas

Aetna Better Health of Kansas believes that members should have the opportunity to be leaders in their care. Aetna Better Health uses a model of care management that empowers members to decide what their health goals are, and then the plan works with them, their families, providers and caregivers to help them achieve their goals. The payoff to our members comes in the form of increased quality of care and quality of life. Aetna Better Health services individuals who qualify for KanCare in the State of Kansas.

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

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NAFC grant spotlight: Broad Street Clinic

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A photo of the exterior of the Broad Street Clinic in North Carolina.

CVS Health Foundation has partnered with the National Association of Free & Charitable Clinics (NAFC) on a multi-year program, awarding grants to increase access to care, improve health outcomes and lower overall health-care costs across the country.

Among the 2019 NAFC grant recipients is the Broad Street Clinic, a North Carolina-based clinic that was founded in 1993 by a group of local physicians and is dedicated to providing care to the uninsured and low-income members of its Morehead City community.

The Communities Served by the Broad Street Clinic

Broad Street Clinic (BSC) serves Carteret County and the surrounding areas. Currently, BSC serves 850 patients with about 3,000 visits annually for adult primary and specialty care. The majority of BSC patients are employed by the local commercial fishing, hospitality and tourism industries.

Community-Focused Chronic Disease Care

BSC provides free medical and pharmaceutical services to uninsured and underinsured, low income people with certain chronic illnesses, including diabetes, hypertension, thyroid disease, pulmonary and cardiovascular disease, and hepatitis C. BSC also provides gynecological and limited dental and vision services.

How the CVS Health Foundation Grant is Helping

BSC has been using the CVS Health Foundation grant to provide health coaching for diabetic patients. By learning to use the clinic’s electronic health records reporting, clinic providers have been able to target patients with diabetes and then further check A1C levels and last testing dates.

Since receiving the CVS Health Foundation grant, Broad Street Clinic has held two diabetes workshops. Participants have gotten to know one another and are sharing personal tips and tricks for managing their condition.
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These patients are encouraged to attend diabetic workshops held at the clinic to learn more about the disease and how to manage it. Clinic nurses and diabetic educators work with patients to teach them about healthy lifestyle changes and to develop their individual self-care plans.

A Group Effort to Better Manage Diabetes

Since receiving the CVS Health Foundation grant, BSC has held two diabetes workshops, with plans for more in the works. At each, participants got to know one another and share personal tips and tricks for managing their condition. They also filled out self-management goal worksheets, which they placed in self-addressed envelope to be mailed a month later so that they can check their own progress.

In addition, each participant received a pair of support stockings to help with leg and foot circulation and reduce swelling, a common symptom of diabetes. One woman, a cashier, called the clinic to report that the stockings helped her to feel more comfortable while on her feet all day.

To stay up-to-date on the latest CVS Health Social Responsibility news and content, sign up for email news alerts.

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Alzheimer’s Association

Help us build a future without Alzheimer’s.

Every 65 seconds, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s.

Currently, more than 5 million Americans are living with the disease, and that number is expected to grow to 14 million by 2050. 

To show our support for all who are impacted by Alzheimer’s, including those living with the disease, their families and caregivers, we’ve committed to raising $10 million over the next three years for the Alzheimer’s Association.

All donations will provide care and support services to those affected, while advancing research toward treatment, prevention and ultimately, a cure.

Learn more about Alzheimer’s and dementia at www.alz.org.

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Developing Bilingual Pharmacists to Break Down Barriers

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A Hispanic pharmacist fills a prescription.

Ashley Mendez’s family fled Cuba in the wake of Fidel Castro’s rise to power and settled in Miami, rebuilding their life from scratch — with little money, few possessions and no ability to speak English.

Watching her family, Ashley understood from a young age how difficult even the simplest tasks could be when you didn’t speak the same language as everyone else. That was particularly true for health care: Ashley and her family believe her grandmother’s death may have been caused in part by miscommunication over the painkiller she was taking for a pinched nerve.

So when it came time to choose a career, Ashley knew exactly what she wanted to do — and where she wanted to do it. She wanted to be a pharmacist and she wanted to work somewhere she could help people who didn’t speak English.

It was the way she could honor her grandmother.

“She was one of the most influential people in my life,” says Ashley. “If we had known more about what was going on, we could have helped her.”

There are many different barriers that prevent people from getting the health care they need: They may live in an area without the right providers, they may lack the transportation to travel to the right facility, they may not have enough money to afford the right treatment.

But one critical barrier that frequently gets overlooked is the language barrier.

According to the U.S. Census Department, the number of residents who speak Spanish at home has skyrocketed 130 percent since 1990, up to about 40 million. That increase has created an overwhelming demand for bilingual pharmacists — but the supply has not kept pace. While Hispanics comprise 18 percent of the nation’s population, they account for less than 5 percent of the pharmacist workforce.

Ashley, 27, is part of CVS Health’s effort to close the gap. She spent the summer of 2017 in an immersive internship program that seeks to help develop bilingual pharmacists. Interns spend 10 weeks shadowing pharmacists who are fluent in Spanish and participating in the care of Spanish-speaking patients. They learn medical terminology, study diseases prevalent in the Hispanic community, and become familiar with the over-the-counter products most popular among Hispanic customers.

The program is an illustration of the company’s belief that you can’t build healthy communities unless you have a workforce that reflects those communities.

“People are looking for a pharmacist they feel comfortable talking to,” says Alex Acuna, 26, another intern in the program, who attended the University of Texas at Austin.

Alex grew up in an El Paso neighborhood that was 80 percent Latino, and in a household where his mother regularly spoke Spanish. But although he could speak a fair amount of Spanish himself, communicating technical details to his Spanish-speaking customers was difficult. Nuances were being lost in translation. In normal conversation, those nuances could be insignificant. When talking about treatments and medication, they could be critical.

Alex knew he had to learn “pharmacy Spanish,” as he described it.

“When was first starting, my Spanish was a little broken,” he says.  “Saying something a certain way could mean something different to a patient.”

The internship program is one of several efforts from CVS Health to address the language gap. Last year, CVS Health gave the Roseman University College of Pharmacy $25,000 to fund Hispanic recruitment and outreach initiatives and establish a pipeline of Spanish-speaking students.

Alex, who earned his license in May, is working now back in his hometown of El Paso. He says he’s grateful to be able to give back to the community that raised him.

Ashley, who attended Florida State University as an undergraduate and studied pharmacy at Mercer University in Atlanta, says she’d love to go back to Miami, where she grew up and where she served her internship.

But she also knows that in Florida, she’ll be one among many Spanish speakers — and that she might do more for the Latino community by staying where she is now.

“There’s a need for Spanish speakers in Atlanta,” she says. “You can tell that the language barrier is a big issue.”

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

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Rewriting Their Stories: Collaborative Treatment for Trafficking Victims

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Utilizing the resources of our combined companies, our commitment to improving health community by community includes everything from free neighborhood health clinics to the difficult, personal issues of treating addiction.

In Arizona, it involves going into communities dealing with the growing epidemic of human trafficking through a public-private effort that involves Mercy Care, a Medicaid managed care organization managed by Aetna, as well as the Phoenix Police Department and other social services programs.

In the video above, learn how a holistic, first-of-its-kind treatment program, the Maricopa County Child Sex Trafficking Collaborative, is working with multiple health care partners to get victims off the street and on a path to better health.

As Skye Steel, CEO of Street Light USA says in the video: “Children who have been trafficked can recover. It does take a lot of time, a lot of people, a lot of energy, a lot of love…but their story can be rewritten.”

For more information about CVS Health’s efforts to improve care across the nation, visit our News & Insights page and the CVS Health Impact Dashboard. To stay informed about the latest updates and innovations from CVS Health, register for content alerts and our Leaders in Care newsletter.

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